Justin Halberda, PhD

Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences
Johns Hopkins University


Enter Site

Professor Halberda co-directs two laboratories that often work together

The Laboratory for Child Development with Lisa Feigenson, PhD

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In the Laboratory For Child Development we are interested in language acquisition and the possibility that logical deductive inference may play a role in the learning of new words. Working with infants, children, and adults, students in the lab receive training in eye-tracking and classic anticipatory-looking paradigms with a possible focus in the development of logical reasoning abilities broadly construed or in the constraints that guide word-learning. Recent interests also include collaborative work looking at quantifier terms (e.g., "most") and how these word meanings interact with the non-linguistic numerical systems that supply them with numeric content (e.g., the Approximate Number System). This work is exciting as it bridges linguistics and psychology using classical psychophysics as a tool to uncover the structures that support word meanings.


The Vision and Cognition Lab, with Jonathan Flombaum, PhD

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In the Vision And Cognition Lab we have an interest in the organization of attention, working memory, and the connection of mind to world. How do we take the continuous information that we receive from the senses and construct a representation of the world that is filled with discrete individual objects? How are individual objects then grouped to form sets of objects and set-based representations then constructed? Students in the lab have utilized both empirical methods (change detection, multiple object tracking, rapid enumeration) and computational modeling (symbolic and connectionist) to understand how attention and memory may play a role in these processes.

Publications

Areas of interest include Perception, Thought and Language

Demos

Explore some demonstrations and data visualizations from recent work

Curriculum Vitae

Dr. Halberda is a Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Johns Hopkins University

Join Us

Find out how to join our team!

Selected Publications


For a more complete list, see here

Perception

Vision, Number, Ensembles

Odic, D., & Halberda, J. (2015). Eye movements reveal distinct encoding patterns of number and cumulative surface area in random dot arrays. Journal of Vision, 15(15):5, 1–15. [pdf]

Pailian, H. & Halberda, J. (2015). The reliability and internal consistency of one-shot and flicker change detection for measuring individual differences in visual working memory capacity. Memory & Cognition, 43(3), 397-420. [pdf]

Libertus, M.E., Landau, B., Feigenson, L., Halberda, J. (2014). Understanding the mapping between numerical approximation and number words: Evidence from Williams syndrome and typical development. Developmental Science, 17(6), 905-919. [pdf]

Halberda, J., Sires, S. & Feigenson, L. (2006). Multiple spatially-overlapping sets can be enumerated in parallel. Psychological Science, 17(7), 572-576. [pdf]

Thought

Cognition & Development

Libertus, M., Odic, D., Feigenson, L. & Halberda, J. (2016). The Precision of Mapping Between Number Words and the Approximate Number System Predicts Children’s Formal Math Abilities. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology 150, 207‐226. [pdf]

Pailian, H., Libertus, M.E., Feigenson, L. & Halberda, J. (2016). Visual working memory capacity increases between ages 3 and 8 years, controlling for gains in attention, perception, and executive control. Attention, Perception and Psychophysics, 78:1556–1573. [pdf]

Language

Language-Cognition Interface

Lidz, J., Pietroski, P., Hunter, T. & Halberda, J. (2011). Interface transparency and the psychosemantics of ‘most’. Natural Language Semantics, 19, 227‐256. [pdf]

Halberda, J., Taing, L. & Lidz, J. (2008). The development of “most” comprehension and its potential dependence on counting-ability in preschoolers. Language Learning and Development, 4(2), 99-121. [pdf]

Demos


Halberda, J., Ly, R., Wilmer, J., Naiman, D., & Germine, L. (2012). Number Sense across the lifespan as revealed by a massive internet-based sample. PNAS [Demo]

Spiegel, C., & Halberda, J. (2010) Rapid fast-mapping abilities in 2-year-olds. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology [Demo]

Halberda, J., Mazzocco, M. & Feigenson, L. (2008). Individual differences in non-verbal number acuity correlate with maths achievement. Nature [Demo]

Halberda, J. & Feigenson, L. (2008). Developmental Change in the Acuity of the Number Sense: The Approximate Number System in 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-Year-Olds and Adults. Developmental Psychology [Demo]

Halberda, J., Taing, L. & Lidz, J. (2008). The development of “most” comprehension and its potential dependence on counting-ability in preschoolers. Language Learning and Development [Demo]

Halberda, J., Sires, S.F., & Feigenson, L. (2006). Multiple spatially-overlapping sets can be enumerated in parallel. Psychological Science [Demo]

Halberda, J. (2006). Is this a dax which I see before me? Use of the logical argument disjunctive syllogism supports word-learning in children and adults. Cognitive Psychology [Demo]

Nichols, S. & Halberda, J. (in preparation). Modal reasoning in preschoolers. [Demo]